Archive | Digital Humanities RSS feed for this section

Should I Blog? Reflections of a Doctoral Student

7 Apr


blog

My blog has lain barren for several months now, one of the many victims that fell in the final push towards the completion of my doctoral thesis and preparations for the viva voce examination.

Recently, a colleague @americasstudies wrote a piece on her experience as a blogger and the friction that lies, still, in academia when the term ‘blogging’ or ‘blogger’ comes up in conversation. This is a recurring debate – both for students and academics – and one which is, I feel, is an important discussion.

As I have just completed the doctorate, and am looking back on the experiences that I have had with social media and blogging during this time, I have decided that my re-entry into blogging will be with a post about blogging and the potential benefits this area holds for research students.

Fear of the white page and the red ink.

rewrite

The one thing that plagues every graduate student – the feeling that you need to read more.

‘I need to read more on these topics’ / ‘If I read x then I can write a better chapter about p because z mentions it’ / ‘I keep hearing this person’s name come up in conferences, I should read them before I write anything else in case I have to change something later’ / ‘I don’t really deal with that area but y is a big name and may be useful later on’…

The excuses are endless, and the sentiment isn’t (always) a reticence to write but rather a fear to write something that won’t be good enough. Unfortunately, a thesis cannot be written by reading alone.

The white page looms large. Not only do you have to write about something, you have to make sure you write using somebodies, even more worrying, the right somebodies. The true idea of a draft, especially to those starting out, is a concept not fully appreciated.   Before I met with my supervisor to talk about the first piece of written work I had submitted to her, I received one of the best pieces of advice about the drafting process:

“The more red pen you get, the better”.

Your first draft will have red ink. Hopefully, a lot. This is especially true if you have more than one supervisor.

I can see the dubious faces out there, but think about it. Take a look back at some of the essays you wrote as an undergraduate that received good marks and look at your work now. Would you receive the same mark for that undergraduate work if you handed that up at postgraduate level? 

Your supervisor has to read the work properly, not just gloss over it, to see the mistakes. Red ink means your supervisor/s care/s enough to help you learn and push your abilities to higher standards.

red ink

Blog posts are generally much shorter than academic papers. They can be multidisciplinary; you can add images, imbed videos, hyperlink to other information or people. They can be fun. The white page becomes less confrontational and more interactive. Blog posts do not require the same rigour as academic writing. That said, they can also be the beginning of an idea that you decide to expand into a larger, more formal written piece, later on.

Blogging makes you the writer, editor and publisher all in one. It makes you more self critical. It makes you demand more from what you write. Structure, tone, style, content, all become more intimately assessed. Nobody wants to publish something bad.

Blogging gives you the red ink.

What do I write and When? Shut Up and Write!

Blogging

The focus of a student’s blog does not necessarily have to directly reflect the student’s research. My thesis is entitled “Oppositional Consciousness, Dialogism and Re-membering in the novels of Helena Maria Viramontes“, my blog does not reflect the novelistic concerns or theoretical tools I engage with in that work, at all.

It does, however, deal with contemporary and historical Chicano/a concerns, which loosely ties in with Viramontes, who identifies as a Chicana writer. It has also allowed me to keep abreast of other research interests, such as border studies, the immigration debate, U.S. and Mexican politics, the media, education and digital technology in the humanities.

Not only that, it has given me a space where I can think about these things critically, and actively engage with these discussions rather than allow the information to passively pass me by. This critical engagement also complements the analytic skills you need to write a thesis.

When you write is different for everyone but, if you have time to procrastinate, you have time to blog.

There are also groups like the Shut Up and Write! movement, #AcWriMo on Twitter, and possibly a similar group or activity in your own university (if not, why not make one?).

Things I learned about my own writing through blogging:

A) I waffle.

B) I have a habit of swapping between US and British English spelling.

C) I have the ability to write something to completion.

D) Editing takes longer than writing.

E) My conclusions need more work.

F) I need to write more.

Blogs reflect the skill of the blogger. The more you write, the better you become.

gaiman writing

Advertisements

Memory – A Call for Articles

12 Oct
Aigne

Aigne Logo

Last month, Aigne (which means ‘mind’ in Irish) released its first edition on the topic of IDENTITY. Housed under the auspices of the Graduate School of the College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences in University College Cork, this online postgraduate, peer-reviewed  journal is an interdisciplinary endeavour between postgraduates and staff of the College.

Embracing the surging wave of digital humanities and the growing move to digital editions by academic and mainstream publishing houses, Aigne provides practical experience for any student with an interest in online editing and publishing. Moreover, Aigne also provides a forum for the discussion and dissemination of current postgraduate research from across the humanities through its publication of peer-reviewed articles. The rigorous review process that has been put in place ensures quality content in its editions and Aigne’s affiliation with CORA (the Cork Open Research Archive) guarantees that any articles published by Aigne will be stored in a manner that actively promotes exposure and citations.

Aigne’s next issue will deal with the topic MEMORY. Papers are accepted in both English and Irish. The deadline for submissions is December 31st.

For any postgraduate with research in this area who would like to avail of a publishing outlet for their work or for any student who would like to become involved as a reviewer or would even like to know how to set up a journal in your own university contact: aigneucc@gmail.com

Our official site is located in University College Cork web domain. You can find our IDENTITY publication here.

You can also find us on Facebook, Twitter (@Aigne_Journal) or WordPress

A downloadable PDF of the Memory CFP

UCL DH2010 Plenary

3 Aug

Invigorating plenary talk by Melissa Terras at the DH2010 found its way to Times Higher. The write-up, which highlighted negative aspects of the talk, got a lot of criticism from delegates present at the talk. Melissa herself writes about it in her blog.

An excellent talk I would definitely recommend viewing.