Archive | November, 2013

Call for Papers

26 Nov

The Irish Centre for Mexican Studies is hosting a research symposium on Mexican and Mexican American Studies in June, 2014. We’re very excited and honoured to confirm Chicana / Native American poet Lorna Dee Cervantes as our keynote speaker!

Pathways, Explorations, Approaches

RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM IN MEXICAN AND MEXICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES

PATHWAYS, EXPLORATIONS, APPROACHES

4-5 June 2014

This symposium invites participation from scholars working both in the area traditionally constituted as Mexican Studies and also in the area of Mexican-American and/or Chicano Studies. Its focus is deliberately expansive and we welcome proposals that will illuminate current approaches to, explorations of and pathways through these rich multidisciplinary fields that are underpinned by work in both the social sciences and humanities.  The symposium aims to showcase research into Mexican and Mexican-American Studies as currently conceptualised, studied and taught in the academy. The symposium provides the opportunity to debate and discuss scholarly research and inquiry on Mexico from a diverse range of disciplinary perspectives. Interventions in the areas of cultural studies, literatures, art, theatre and performance, history, political science, anthropology, sociology and digital humanities are welcome. Papers that problematise area studies’ approaches or that chronicle the issues…

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How Academia Resembles a Drug Gang

25 Nov

Alexandre Afonso

In 2000, economist Steven Levitt and sociologist Sudhir Venkatesh published an article in the Quarterly Journal of Economics about the internal wage structure of a Chicago drug gang. This piece would later serve as a basis for a chapter in Levitt’s (and Dubner’s) best seller Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything (P.S.) The title of the chapter, “Why drug dealers still live with their moms”, was based on the finding that the income distribution within gangs was extremely skewed in favor  of those at the top, while the rank-and-file street sellers earned even less than employees in legitimate low-skilled activities, let’s say at McDonald’s. They calculated 3.30 dollars as the hourly rate, that is, well below a living wage (that’s why they still live with their moms). [2]

If you take into account the risk of being shot by rival gangs, ending up in jail or…

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